A Favorite Recipe

 

 
Over the weekend I was going through a box of old books we had never unpacked when we moved here a year ago, and I came across an old 1889 Indiana Educational Series Fourth Reader.
 
Inside this antique book was the above recipe that had been cut out of a newspaper.
I have seen similar recipes, but never this one.
 
You certainly wouldn’t find any poems today using the Middle English term ‘kith and kin’, which means friends and family, now would you?
 
It’s been a long while since I’ve had any children in Fourth grade, but one of my granddaughters is in the Fifth grade.
When we go to Michigan to visit them again I believe I’ll give her the definition test that I found in this antique Fourth Reader book.
She’s a smart girl, but I’m guessing she won’t have been taught any of these words in her classroom yet.
Definitions:
caprice, whim                |                   requisite, necessary
heir, one who inherits  |                    device, contrivance
cubit, about 18 inches     |                     abominable, hateful
stipulations, conditions  |  ingenious, skillful in inventing
composed, calm; quiet
 
Would a fourth grader today be made to memorize and recite Longfellow’s,
If you have a moment, click on the above link and then give me your opinion on how you would rate todays education system compared to the children who were taught from this Indiana Fourth Reader.
 
I just received an e-mail from Kathryn at The Dedicated House that my Budget Porch was featured on her Sunday Showcase post. I hope you can drop by and see the other featured blogs as well!
 
Partying Here:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


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20 thoughts on “A Favorite Recipe

  1. Tell me not in mournful numbers life is but a broken dream for the heart is dead that slumbers and…How am I doing so far? I was never taught this poem in 4th grade or any grade. I just like the poem and since HW Longfellow was Maine born, we kind of know his stuff. I'd say that when they used to say that a man had only an 8th grade education, he had more than many college grads today. Have you ever seen some of those math tests? Yikes!

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  2. As I remember, Grade IV was all about memorisation – The Highwayman, If etc. I find that children in Grade IV today are still wrestling with basic arithmetic and spelling.

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  3. Kimberly,I feel the children of our previous generations were taught at a different standard than those today.Heck, the children today aren't even required to write in cursive. The public school system has dumb down the education and requirements.

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  4. Ah that Psalm of Life is beautiful, as are many of Longfellow's works. It would be a good thing if children today were made to study the classics, but I don't think it happens much anymore. The recipe is wonderful, wouldn't that look great on a wall in the kitchen?

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  5. That would be sweet embroidered up in a sampler. I am not a reader of poems but there are a few that I love and that is one of them. It says so much in so few words. It's a true recipe for life.

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  6. I love that Longfellow poem. Do kids even read stuff like this anymore? Back in the olden days of my youth, we had wonderful literature books in school, Prose & Poetry, so we're exposed to these lovely works. Also, the Bible was taught as literature. I'm pretty sure the Bible has been deleted from all but a Christian school curriculum.

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  7. Hi Kimberly,I would have loved to have memorized this in fourth grade! Instead, I remember having to learn by heart a poem called, 'Somebody Said That It Couldn't Be Done', and I can still recite it all today!Have a great weekend!Poppy

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